Fuel Cell Facility Expands Role and Changes Name

The Hawaiian Electric Company together with the Hawai‘i Natural Energy Institute hosted an event to commemorate the expansion of their research partnership. The facility has been renamed the “Hawai‘i Sustainable Energy Research Facility” (HiSERF). For details, see the HiSERF Announcement.

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Open House for the Water, Energy, and Soil Sustainablity (WESS) Program

The WESS program will hold an open house on Friday, August 31, 2012, from 3:00 pm to 4:30 pm, at the Magoon Research Station, 2717 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu (across from the Manoa Public Library). The purpose of the open hourse is to present WESS research investigating the effect of biochar-amended soils on plant growth. After light pupus and an overview of the WESS program, presentations will be made by Jerry Ericsson and Jonathan Deenik. Mr. Ericsson is President of Diacarbon Energy, Inc., a Canadian biochar company. Dr. Deenik is an Associate Specialist in Soil Fertivity and Soil Quality.

The open house will then move into the greenhouse for close-up inspection and further discussions. Off-site visits to WESS-funded field crop trials (directed by Dr. Richard Ogoshi, Associate Biofuel Agronomist) will be possible. These trials will characterize crop growth on biochar-amended soils.

For those interested, a short walk will lead to the UH campus for a visit to the demonstration-scale Flash Carbonization™ reactor, after the greenhouse visit (~4:30 pm). Dr. Michael Antal, an HNEI researcher and inventor of the Flash Carbonization™ process, provides the WESS program with small quantities of boutique biochars for application greenhouse trials. Details concerning this process can be seen on the Biocarbons (overview) section of our website.

For more program details, see the WESS brochure and the Water, Energy and Soil Sustainability (WESS) section of our website. Contact Dr. Michael Cooney, HNEI Associate Researcher and PI for the program, for additional information.

Carbon Substitution and Sequestration: Additional NSF Funding

The National Science Foundation (NSF) sponsored Carbon Substitution and Sequestration (CarbSS) project of the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) is designed to introduce University of Hawai‘i (UH) engineering graduate students to the science of biomass carbonization and combustion, and the characterization of biocarbons through hands-on laboratory studies involving unique equipment housed in HNEI of UH and the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU).

Download the informational briefing.  Principal Investigator for this project is Michael J. Antal, Jr., Coral Industries Professor of Renewable Energy Resources.

Bioplastic Material Developed by HNEI Hits the Market

The Miss Sissi lamp   (Photo:Business Wire)

HNEI’s Associate Researcher, Jian Yu, PhD, has developed a process for producing environmentally friendly bioplastic (PHA polymer) from organic residues of food processing and biofuel production.  This patented process has been licensed to Bio-on (an Italian company).  Now, the world’s first product made with this biopolymer has been presented onto the commercial market.  This product is the Miss Sissi lamp designed by Philippe Stark for the Italian company, Flos, and now presented by Bio-on in an innovative, completely biodegradable material to replace polycarbonate.  

Bio-on  has chosen to work with Techint Engineering & Construction to build plants for production of the PHA bioplastic using waste materials from sugar beet and cane processing.  The first plant will produce 10 thousand tons per year of this bioplastic.  Download the press release.  The HNEI contact for this project is Jian Yu.

HNEI is conducting energy efficiency research at Ilima Intermediate School

Project Frog classroom at Ilima Intermediate School.   Credit: Priscilla Thompson (HNEI) & Hawaii DOE.
 

A new Project Frog classroom for teaching students and scientists
Contact:  A. James Maskrey, (808) 956-3645  Assistant Specialist, Hawaii Natural Energy Institute
Students at Ilima Intermediate School in Ewa Beach, Oʻahu will have the unique opportunity to learn in a classroom that is itself a learning platform.  A 1,200-square-foot, state-of-the-art structure has been installed at the school, the first of three sites selected for energy research that will test the effectiveness of innovative energy efficient buildings powered by renewable energy. The Hawaiʻi Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) of the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa is leading the research study which will analyze the performance of these energy systems for potential future Navy applications in the Pacific region.
“We're delighted to participate in and be the beneficiary of this innovative project,” said Assistant Superintendent Randy Moore of the State of Hawaiʻi Department of Education. “It will excite our students and staff on the campus to know they are a part of leading edge research and development work into creating environments that support student learning and are friendly to the planet.”
The pre-engineered test platform, created by California-based Project Frog, Inc., incorporates passive design elements to decrease energy demand, thus increasing the effectiveness of its photovoltaic systems.  The structure will be outfitted with high-tech energy monitoring instruments providing valuable research data on the performance of design and material components.
Project Frog’s design provides air quality management and thermal comfort through the use of natural convection and air displacement to reduce the requirements for mechanized systems. Optimized daylighting and glare reduction provides high quality illumination for over 95 percent of daylight hours, keeping the electrical lights off during most of the school year.  The design reduces energy consumption, construction waste and operating expense, while providing spaces that are adaptable for a variety of uses.
"We are excited to play such an integral role in HNEI's research and together advance the science and technology behind all new construction throughout the Islands," said Nikki Tankursley, director of marketing for Project Frog.
“Frog buildings are very responsive to the Hawaiian climate,” according to Tankursley. “With a small rooftop photovoltaic array, the classroom at Ilima Intermediate School produces more energy than it consumes.”
At Ilima Intermediate School, HNEI will also compare the performance of two different photovoltaic systems, one using a high efficiency crystalline technology, and the other using a newer thin film technology.
“This important assignment is part of a larger research program to evaluate energy technologies for the Office of Naval Research that includes a range of efficiency, storage, and renewable generation systems,” said Dr. Richard Rocheleau, HNEI Director.
The Office of Naval Research is providing funding for the project through a grant to the University of Hawai'i. Projects that support the Department of Navy's energy programs to demonstrate technologies that enable increased implementation of alternative energy sources and promote energy security are made possible by the efforts of U.S. Senator Inouye, Senate Appropriations chairman, to ensure that the Department of Defense has adequate resources to make these critical, cutting-edge investments in energy technology.
Project partners include the State of Hawai'i Department of Education, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa – Hawaiʻi Natural Energy Institute, and Project Frog, Inc.
 

HNEI Researcher Leads $1 million Sustainability Project

Michael J. Cooney, Associate Researcher at HNEI, is leader for a cross campus collaborative team that won the recent $1 million University-wide Sustainability competition with a project aimed at developing and placing water, energy, and soil sustainability technologies in local industry. This will be a two-year effort involving faculty from HNEI, CTHAR, Shidler College of Business, Oceanography, and local companies such as Pacific Biodiesel and RealGreen Power.

Read more in the University of Hawaii news story.  HNEI's contact for this project is Michael Cooney.

Hawaii National Marine Renewable Energy Center (HINMREC)

The Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) has created a Hawaii National Marine Renewable Energy Center (HINMREC), having recently won 5 years of funding from the Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Office of the US Department of Energy (DOE).  Activites in this center focus on developing and evaluating marine resources and technologies to harness the energy from waves and from ocean thermal temperature gradients. The website for this center can be accessed at http://hinmrec.hnei.hawaii.edu. The HNEI contact is Luis A. Vega.

Flash Carbonization™ Produces Clean Charcoal

Flash Carbonization™ tests of Honolulu’s sewage sludge are being sponsored at HNEI to help eliminate smoke emissions from the Flash Carbonization™ Demonstration Reactor, reduce CO emissions to satisfy regulations, and produce clean charcoal for various markets. Read more about Biocarbons (charcoal). Contact Michael Antal for more information.

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